Uniform Regulations, 1864


Dress for Petty Officers and Crew.

Boatswain's mates, gunner's mates, carpenter's mates, sailmakers' mates and ship's cook, will wear, embroidered in white silk, on the right sleeve of their blue jackets, above the elbow, in front, and eagle and anchor, of not more than three inches in length, with a star of one inch in diameter one inch above. The same device, embroidered in blue, to be worn on the sleeves of their white frocks in summer.

All other petty officers, except officers's stewards, will wear the same device on their left sleeves.

The outside clothing for petty officers, firemen, and coal-heavers, seamen, ordinary seamen, landsmen and boys, for muster, shall consist of blue cloth jackets and trowsers, or blue woollen frocks; black hats; black silk neckerchiefs, and shoes, or boots in cold weather. In warm weather it shall consist of white frocks and trowsers; black or white hats, as the commander may for the occasion direct, having proper regard for the comfort of the crew; black silk neckerchiefs, and shoes; the collars and cuffs to be lined with blue cotton cloth, and stitched round with thread. Thick black cloth caps, without visors, may be worn by the crew at sea, except on holidays or at muster.

It is strictly enjoined upon commandants of stations and commanding officers of the navy to see that the foregoing regulations are complied with in every respect, and to require all deviations from them to be corrected.

GIDEON WELLES,
Secretary of the Navy.
NAVY DEPARTMENT, January 28, 1864.


Source: Uniform for Officers of the United States Navy, As Prescribed in Regulations for the Uniform of the U.S. Navy, Jan. 28, 1864. Tomes, Melvain & Co., 6 Maiden Lane, New York. Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1864, BY TOMES, MELVAIN & CO., in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States, in and for the Southern District of New-York. The text is reproduced here exactly as in the original, following the original use of capitalization and italics.