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Zumwalt I (DDG 1000)

Ships seal
Ships seal.
photo of Adm. Elmo R. Zumwalt, Jr.
Adm. Elmo R. Zumwalt, Jr.

Elmo R. Zumwalt, Jr. -- born in San Francisco, Calif., on 29 November 1920 -- entered the U.S. Naval Academy in 1939, and was commissioned ensign on 19 June 1942. He served on board destroyers Phelps (DD 360) and Robinson (DD 562) during World War II, and received the Bronze Star for his actions as an evaluator in Robinson’s Combat Information Center during a torpedo attack against Japanese battleships at the Battle of Leyte Gulf, on 25 October 1944. Following the war, he commanded (as prize crew officer) Japanese river gunboat Ataka, and steamed her up the Yangtze River to disarm enemy troops in the Shanghai area (8 December 1945–March 1946).

Zumwalt served as the navigator of Wisconsin (BB 64) during the Korean War, piloting the battleship into the closest positions possible to obtain the maximum effect of her gunfire (23 November 1951–30 March 1952). He commanded guided missile frigate Dewey (DLG 14) (commissioned on 7 December 1959), and advanced to a succession of senior commands including Cruiser-Destroyer Flotilla Seven (July 1965–July 1966), Director, Systems Analysis Division, Chief of Naval Operations (August 1966–August 1968), Commander, Naval Forces Vietnam, and Naval Advisory Group Vietnam (September 1968–May 1970), and Chief of Naval Operations (July 1970–July 1974).

During his time as Chief of Naval Operations, the admiral worked to integrate men of color, and women, into the Navy. Sailors appreciated Zumwalt’s ‘Z-Grams’ whereby he initiated procedures to improve morale and liberalized naval practices concerning personal expression, such as allowing sailors to wear their hair longer or by reducing inspections. Zumwalt died at Duke University Medical Center, Durham, N.C., on 2 January 2000.

I

(DDG 1000: displacement 14,564; length 610'; beam 80.7'; draft 28'; speed 30 knots; complement 148; armament 20 Mk 57 Vertical Launch System modules (80 cells) for RIM-162 Evolved Sea Sparrow Missiles, BGM-109E Tactical Tomahawks, and RUM-139C Anti-Submarine Rockets, two 155 millimeter Advanced Gun Systems, two Mk 46 30 millimeter Naval Weapon Systems, and two Sikorsky MH-60R Seahawk helicopters or one Seahawk and up to three Northrop Grumman RQ-8A Fire Scout Vertical Takeoff and Landing Tactical Unmanned Aerial Vehicles; class Zumwalt)

Zumwalt (DDG 1000) was laid down on 17 November 2011 at Bath, Maine, by General Dynamics Bath Iron Works Corp.; launched on 28 October 2013; co-sponsored by Ann Zumwalt and Mouzetta Zumwalt-Weathers, two of the admiral’s children; and is scheduled to commission in 2015, Capt. James A. Kirk in command.

U.S. Navy photograph 080723-N-0000X-001
An artistís conception of the ship in action in a future battle. (U.S. Navy photograph 080723-N-0000X-001, Defense Visual Information Center)

 

The federal government shutdown compelled the postponement of the christening and launching of the ship, from her original scheduled date of 19 to 28 October 2013.
 
Detailed history under construction.


Last Edited: 10/31/2013
Mark L. Evans