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Veritas

 

Minor planet No. 490, discovered on 3 September 1902 by astronomer Max Wolf of Heidelberg, Germany. The planet is named for a mythological goddess, the daughter of Time and Saturn.

 

(AKA-50: dp. 7,080; 1. 426'0"; b. 58'0"; dr. 16'0"; s. 16.9 k.; cpl. 303; a. 1 5", 8 40mm.; cl. Sidonia; T. S4-SE2-BE1)

 

Veritas (AKA-50) was laid down under a Maritime Commission contract (MC hull 1911) on 26 April 1945 at Providence, R.I., by the Walsh-Kaiser Co., Inc.; launched on 16 June 1945; sponsored by Mrs. Fred B. Smith; and commissioned on 19 July 1945, Lt. Comdr. A. S. Brooks, USNR, in command.

 

Into the fall of 1945, Veritas operated along the Atlantic coast, making cargo runs which took her as far north as Boston and ranged south to Hampton Roads, Va. After loading cargo at Norfolk from 22 to 26 October, Veritas got underway on the 26th for Bermuda and the only duty which took her away from the eastern seaboard of the United States.

 

The cargo vessel returned to Norfolk and transported cargo to Baltimore in December and made stops at Bayonne, N.J., and New York City before heading for Hampton Roads early in 1946. She arrived at Norfolk on 17 January 1946 and was decommissioned on 21 February 1946. Struck from the Navy list on 12 April 1946, the cargo vessel was delivered to the Maritime Commission on 29 June 1946, in whose custody she remained until disappearing from registers of American merchant shipping in 1949.