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Tunxis

 

An American Indian tribe which derived its name from Wuttunkshau, or "the point where the river bends." This term referred to the bend of the Farming-ton River, near Farmington and Southington, Conn., in what is now Hartford County. The tribe resided there until they sold most of their territory to the English in 1640 and disappeared soon thereafter.

 

II

 

(AN-90: dp. 785; 1. 146'; b. 33'10"; d. l0'l0"; s. 12.3 k.; cpl. 46; a. 1 3"; cl. Cohoes)

 

The second Tunxis—originally projected as YN-119 —was redesignated AN-90 on 17 January 1944; laid down on 2 May 1944, at Duluth, Minn., by the Zenith Dredge Co.; launched on 18 August 1944; sponsored by Mrs. Edward J. Thye, wife of the Governor of Minnesota; and commissioned on 28 March 1945.

 

Decommissioned on 30 June 1945, the net tender remained in reserve until activated on 20 February 1953. Originally operating out of the 5th Naval District, she was transferred to the 6th District on 4 January 1954 and based at Charleston, S.C.; Savannah, Ga.; and at Key West, Fla. Tunxis participated in Atlantic Fleet exercises off the east coast from 13 to 22 November 1954 before returning to Charleston.

 

On 15 April 1955, the ship was placed "in commission in reserve" before being decommissioned on 20 July of that year. In August 1963, Tunxis was transferred under the Military Assistance Program to the government of Venezuela. She serves the Venezuelan Navy as Puerto Nutrias (H-02).