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Triton

 

A Greek demigod of the sea who was the son of Poseidon and Amphitrite. Triton, who possessed a man's body above the waist and that of a fish below, used his conch-shell trumpet alternately to summon storms and to still the sea.

 

II

 

(StTug: t. 98; 1. 81'; b. 19'; dr. 10' (aft); s. 10 k.; cpl. 10)

 

The second Triton (Id. No. 3312)—a tug built in 1889 at Philadelphia, Pa., by Neafie & Levy—was acquired by the United States Navy on 17 October 1918 from the Independent Pier Co., of Philadelphia, Pa.; and was placed in commission at Philadelphia on 25 October 1918.

 

Acquired less than a month before the Armistice which ended World War I, Triton served only briefly. The Navy had planned to use Triton as a minesweeper and patrol craft in the 4th Naval District, but the end of hostilities in Europe on 11 November 1918 obviated the need for her. In all probability, she spent her entire four-month naval career at Philadelphia, either moored at pierside or, at most, serving as a tug. In any event, Triton was returned to her owner on 8 March 1919, and her name was struck from the Navy list that same day.