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Tjisondari

 

The Dutch spelling of Cisondari, a river in west Java, near Bagor.

 

(ScStr.: dp. 17,350 (n.); 1. 434'0"; b. 58'4" (wl.); dr. 26'10" (mean); s. 12.0 k.; cpl. 70; a. 1 6", 1 3")

 

Tjisondari—a freighter built in 1915 at Flushing, Holland, by Koninklijke Maatschappij de Schelde and owned and operated under the Dutch flag by the Java-China-Japan Line—was seized by American customs officials in the Philippine Islands at Manila after the United States entered World War I. The ship was taken over by the Navy from the United States Shipping Board on 22 March 1918 and commissioned on 3 April.

 

Assigned to the Naval Overseas Transportation Service, the ship sailed five days later for the west coast of the United States and reached San Francisco on 5 May. There, she was refitted for naval service, loaded with Army supplies, and got underway on the 29th for the east coast. After steaming south to Panama, she transited the canal, proceeded north along the Atlantic coast, and arrived at New York on 20 June. Following minor repairs and bunkering with coal, Tjisondari sailed in convoy on Independence Day for France. The Allied ships reached Brest on the 19th; and, the next day, she began discharging her cargo at St. Nazaire. She headed homeward in convoy on 15 August and returned to New York on the 26th.

 

After taking on another cargo of Army supplies, the vessel got underway again in convoy for Europe on 6 September. Her convoy made port at St. Nazaire on the 25th and proceeded thence to Brest where she unloaded. Sailing for the United States on 17 October, she entered New York harbor on the 28th. While there, stalls were built in the ship enabling her to carry 721 horses. The ship then took on cargo, filled her stalls with horses, and sailed once more for France on 27 November. The ship entered Quiberon Bay on 9 December, discharged her cargo, and headed home. However, after she passed between Cape May and Cape Henlopen, the ship ran aground and damaged her hull while ascending the Delaware River. Hence, when she finally reached Philadelphia on 5 January 1919, the vessel badly needed yard work.

 

Repairs and reloading delayed the ship at Philadelphia until she got underway on 19 February, bound for Denmark laden with flour. She discharged her cargo at Copenhagen and headed homeward on 29 March.

 

Tjisondari made port at New York on 10 April and, following voyage repairs, headed for Hampton Roads on the 23d. She took on board a cargo of oil at Norfolk and carried it—via the Panama Canal, San Francisco, and Hong Kong—to the Philippines. She reached Manila on 23 May. Three months later, on 23 August, the ship was decommissioned and returned to her owner.