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DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY -- NAVAL HISTORICAL CENTER
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Scipio

 

A latin word meaning staff; also the name of a patrician Roman family, whose most distinguished historical figures were the generals Publius Cornelius Scipio, Publius Cornelius Scipio Africanus (237 or 235 to 183 B.C.), and Publius Cornelius Scipio Aemilianus Africanus (185 to 129 B.C.).

 

(Str: dp. 6,864; l. 383'; b. 40'; dr. 23'  (mean); dph. 25'9"; s. 14.5 k.)

 

Scipio was built between 1880 and 1882 by William Denny & Bros., Dumbarton, Scotland, as the iron steamship, Ravenna. Renamed Scipio, she was abandoned at sea for unknown causes and was salvaged by George P. Walford, who sold her to the Navy on 5 May 1898.

 

Taken to the New York Navy Yard for fitting out as a naval collier, Scipio was found to be in poor material condition and was placed in ordinary on 23 May 1898. Proposals were advanced to convert the ship to a coal barge for duty at Newport, R.I.; but, after the Bureau of Construction and Repair found this plan to be too expensive, all work was stopped on 20 June 1898.

 

Scipio was retained in ordinary at the New York Navy Yard until surveyed on 31 March 1899 for disposal. Struck from the Navy list on 15 June 1899, she was sold on 28 December 1899 to Ludwig Rubelli of Philadelphia, Pa., for mercantile service. Transferred to Italian registry in the following year, Scipio was destroyed by fire on 3 January 1902 while underway from Cartagena, Spain, for Antwerp.