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DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY -- NAVAL HISTORICAL CENTER
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Savannah

 

A large city on the east coast of Georgia.

 

II

 

(Fr: t. 1,726; b. 47'; dph. 22'8"; cpl. 480; a. 4 8" Sg., 28 32-pdrs., 22 42-pdr. car.)

 

The second Savannah was begun in 1820 at the New York Navy Yard, but she remained on the stocks until 5 May 1842, when she was launched. She was one of nine frigates to be built from a prototype design by naval architect William Doughty.

 

Savannah, with Capt. Andrew Fitzhugh in command, joined the Pacific Squadron as flagship in 1844. As the prospect of war with Mexico became imminent, the Squadron moved into position off the California coast. On 7 July 1846, the Squadron captured Monterey without firing a shot. On 8 September 1847, Savannah returned to New York for repairs.

 

She served as flagship for the Pacific Squadron again from 1849-52. Repairs at Norfolk took her into 1853, and on 9 August of that year, she sailed for a three-year cruise on the Brazil station. In November 1856, she was inactivated, but served as flagship for the Home Squadron on the east coast of Mexico during 1859 and 1860.

 

With the outbreak of the Civil War in 1861, Savannah was deployed off the coast of Georgia, where she shared in the capture of two Confederate prizes, the schooner, E. J. Waterman, and the ship, Cheshire. On 11 February 1862, Savannah was taken out of active service and placed in use as an instruction and practice ship at the United States Naval Academy. In 1870, after conducting her last training cruise to England and France, she was laid up at the Norfolk Navy Yard. She remained there until sold to E. Stannard and Company of Westbrook, Conn., in 1883.