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Sacagawea

 

A Shoshone Indian girl who acted as guide and interpreter for Lewis and Clark on their expedition into the Northwest region of the U.S. “The Bird Woman,” as her name was translated, was an invaluable aide to the explorers. On one occasion, she saved the expedition's records after they had fallen in the Missouri River when her husband's boat capsized.

 

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(YT-241: l. 105'; b. 25'; dr. 13'6") Sacagawea (YT-241) was built in 1942 by Levingston Shipbuilding Co., Orange, Tex., for the Moran Towing Co., New York, N.Y.; purchased by the Maritime Commission for Navy use prior to completion; and reassigned to the Washington Navy Yard for services at the Torpedo Station, Alexandria, Va., and the Torpedo Testing Range, Piney Point, Md. Acceptance by the Navy was cancelled on 1 March 1942, and Sacagawea was retained by the Maritime Commission.

 

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(YT-326: dp. 225; l. 97'; b. 21'8"; dr. 9'; s. 10 k.)

 

Sacagawea (YT-326) was built in 1925 and acquired by the Navy from Brazil in 1942 as Almirante No-ronka. She was renamed Sacagawea on 1 September 1942 and was placed in service as a harbor tug at Charleston, S. C., upon her delivery on 30 September. Reclassified YTM-326 on 15 May 1944, she served at Charleston until she was placed out of service and struck from the Navy list on 22 June 1945. Sacagawea was then turned over to the State Department for disposal and was sold to foreign purchasers in May 1946.