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Squanto

 

A Wampanoag Indian, said to be the only person in Patuxent to escape the plague of 1619. He became a friend of English colonists at Plymouth, Mass., and helped them by acting as guide and interpreter. However, there is some evidence to suggest that he was also acting as a spy or agent for Caunbitant, sachem of Mattapoisett. Squanto died in 1622.

 

(YT-194: dp. 260; l. 100'10"; b. 25'0"; dr. 9'7"; s. 12 k.; cpl. 10; cl. Pessacus)

 

Squanto (YT-194) was built in 1942 by Ira S. Bushy & Son, at Brooklyn, N.Y. She was placed in service early in 1943 in the 10th Naval District, covering the area around the Virgin Islands. Squanto was redesignated a large harbor tug, YTB-194, on 15 May 1944. She was reclassified a medium harbor tug, YTM-194, in February 1962.

 

Squanto served the Navy just over 20 years and spent all her time in the 10th Naval District. The exact date upon which she was inactivated is unknown; but, since the 1962 Naval Vessel Register/Ships Data Book lists her as active and in service in the 10th Naval District and since her name was struck from the Navy list in May 1963, she must have been placed out of service in 1962 or early in 1963. No documents have been found giving the details of the final disposition of her hulk; however, the 1965 NVR shows her as scheduled to be sunk as a target. That is probably what happened to her.