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DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY -- NAVAL HISTORICAL CENTER
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R-11

 

(Submarine No. 88: displacement 569 (surfaced), 680 (submerged); length 1862; beam 18; draft 146; speed 13.5 knots (surfaced), 10.5 knots (submerged); complement 30; armament 1 3, 4 21 torpedo tubes; class R-1)

 

R-11 (Submarine No. 88) was laid down by the Fore River Shipbuilding Co., Quincy, Mass., 18 March 1918; launched 21 July 1919; sponsored by Miss Dorothy Batchelder; and commissioned 5 September 1919, Lt. Comdr. Charles S. Alden in command.

 

R-11, with a crew of only two men for 2 months following commissioning, remained inactive at Boston. Then, with the new year 1920, she commenced training cruises along the New England coast and, in April, to Bermuda. On completion of training cruises, she returned to New London, whence she sailed 31 May for the Pacific. Designated SS-88 in July, she arrived at Pearl Harbor on 4 August. Homeported there for the next 10 years, she conducted operations in the Hawaiian area; searched for missing ships, including the seagoing tug Conestoga (AT-54), and planes; participated in tactical exercises; and engaged in fleet maneuvers.

 

On 12 December 1930, the R-boat departed Pearl Harbor for the last time and steamed east to San Diego, whence she continued on through the Panama Canal, to New London. She returned to that Thames River base 9 February 1931 and for the remainder of the decade served as a training ship, primarily for the Submarine School at New London and occasionally for NROTC units in the southern New England area. Transferred to Key West, 1 June 1941, R-11 continued her training ship duties throughout the remainder of her career.

 

Decommissioned 5 September 1945, R-11 was struck from the Navy list 11 October 1945; sold to Macey O. Smith, Miami, Fla., 13 March 1946; and scrapped in 1948.