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Paul Revere

 

Paul Revere, born in Boston 1 January 1735, became a skillful goldsmith under his father’s guidance. Strongly attached to the patriotic cause in Massachusetts and an instigator of the Boston Tea Party, he subsequently gathered information on British movements and Tory activities, and reported the intelligence to Patriot leaders. On the evening of 18 April 1775, after learning that the king’s troops were about to march, Revere crossed to Charleston by boat and raced on horseback through Medford spreading “...the alarm through every Middlesex village and farm...” along his path to Lexington. There he warned Hancock and Adams that “redcoats” were approaching to arrest them. The next morning minutemen were on hand to challenge the British advance. “The shot heard round the world” was fired launching the Revolution and the American Ship of State.

 

Subsequently helping to win the struggle he had done so much to start, Revere established a powder mill in Massachusetts, served on the Committee of Correspondence, rose in the Massachusetts Militia to Lieutenant Colonel, and fought in the Penobscot Expedition.

 

After the war he returned to business as a gold and silver smith and introduced new techniques in copper metallurgy. His foundry fashioned the bolts, spikes, pumps, and other copper hardware used in building Frigate Constitution.

 

Remaining actively interested in civic affairs, he energetically worked for ratification of the United States Constitution. Paul Revere died in Boston 10 May 1818.

 

(APA–248: dp. 16, 838; l. 563’6”; b. 76’; dr. 27’; s. 20 k.; cpl. 414, trp. 1,500; a. 4 3”; cl. Paul Revere; T. C4–S–1A)

 

Paul Revere (APA–248) was originally laid down as MA hull 27 on 15 May 1952 by the New York SB Corp., Camden, N.J.; launched 11 April 1953 as SS Diamond Mariner; sponsored by Mrs. Franklin Ewers; delivered to MARAD 22 December 1953; operated by the Prudential Steamship Corp. for MARAD; placed in the Maritime Reserve Fleet 24 July 1954; acquired by the Navy 14 September 1956; classified APA–248 and named Paul Revere 4 June 1957; converted by Todd SB Corp., San Pedro, Calif.; and commissioned at Long Beach, Calif. 3 September 1958, Capt. Robert Erly in command.

 

After shakedown, Paul Revere spent the next full year participating in amphibious training operations: “Rock Shoals” at San Diego in November 1958, “Twin Peaks” at Camp Pendleton in February 1959, “PACNAMIDLEX” at Del Mar, Calif. in August, “Clear Ridge” off Calif. in September, and “Totem Pole” at Kodiak, Alaska during November.

 

During 1960–1961, she was assigned “Ready APA” duty, in which she maintained on board, at all times, a fully equipped and reinforced battalion of landing troops to be put as ore on short notice at any trouble spot in the Pacific. On 21 March 1961 trouble flared in Laos, and Paul Revere commenced patrolling the waters off the coast of Southeast Asia. She remained in the area in a ready status for a total of fiftyfour days until tensions eased, then resumed her normal South China Sea patrol.

 

In January 1962, after returning to the U.S., Paul Revere accomplished a most dramatic rescue, when one of several helicopters engaged in ASW exercises plunged into the ocean. Operating several hundred yards from the scene, she launched a manned boat which returned the three crewmen of the helicopter to the ship for medical treatment, all in the space of six minutes.

 

Following overhaul, she spent the remainder of 1962 in coastal amphibious training operations in the San Diego area. The year 1963 saw her complete a successful WestPac deployment and another rigorous schedule of training operations.

 

Departing San Diego on 28 January 1964 for her fourth WestPac deployment en route to Pearl Harbor Paul Revere participated in “Coco Palm”, a merchant convoy sailing exercise. From Pearl Harbor she sailed to Buckner Bay in preparation for one of the largest amphibious operations since the end of World War II. This exercise, called “Back Pack”, involved over 50,000 American and Nationalist Chinese personnel and over 125 ships. It was conducted off the southwestern coast of Taiwan and terminated 12 March. Paul Revere also participated in “Ligtas”, a combined SEATO exercise in the Philippines during May, and operation “Minute Hand”, conducted at Numazu, Japan in July. Returning to the states, she joined another convoy exercise, “Mad Bull”, and arrived San Diego 6 August.

 

Paul Revere spent the first seven months of 1965 conducting training operations off the coast. In August she lifted elements of the 1st Marine Division to Okinawa and during October and November she transported personnel of South Korea’s famed Tiger Division to Qui Nhon, South Vietnam from Pusan. From 7–18 November she conducted her first actual combat assault as a unit involved in operation “Blue Marlin”, with Marine battalions embarked. She was involved in a similar operation called “Double Eagle” at Quang Ngai Province in January 1966 with Marines. She continued lift support for Marine units in Vietnam through March and then returned to San Diego 19 April.

 

Paul Revere resumed coastal operations on her return, until May 1967 when she again deployed to the Far East. As a unit of the Amphibious Ready Group off the coast of Vietnam she engaged in operations “Belt Drive”, “Fortress Sentry”, “Formation Leader”, and “Knox”. She returned to San Diego 16 December and commenced coastal operations. For meritorious service from 7 August 1967 to 11 November 1967 during sustained amphibious operations against communist insurgent forces in the Republic of Vietnam, Paul Revere was awarded the Meritorious Unit Commendation, the first ship of her type to receive the award.

 

During 1968 she participated in training cruises for Naval Reservists and Midshipmen, including a special familiarization cruise for Sea Cadets. She also continued her upkeep and training preparations for her next coming deployment in January 1969.