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Puritan

 

Name commemorating the Puritans of New Engldan.

 

II

 

(Mon: t. 6,060; l. 296’3”; b. 60’ 1˝”; dr. 18’; s. 12.4 k.; cpl. 200; a. 4 12” bIr., 6 4” blr., some 6-pdrs.; cl. Puritan)

 

The never completed Puritan of the Civil War underwent the same extent of rebuilding as the four Miantonomohs under the direction of Secretary of the Navy George Robeson. The revised design of the “repaired” Puritan called for two turrets, and with her suerpstructure, tall stack, and military mast, she had the characteristics which identified the monitors built between 1889 and 1903. The new Puritan was built by John Roach & Son, Chester, Pa. and completed by the New York Navy Yard, Brooklyn, N.Y. She was launched 6 December 1882 and commissioned 10 December 1896, Capt. J. R. Bartlett in command.

 

Puritan had a busy career in 1898 during the SpanishAmerican War. Assigned to the Cuban blockade in April, she U.S. Monitor Puritan as she would have appeared when completed, based on her original Civil War design. (Engraving by Harley).

 

joined New York and Cincinatti in shelling Matanzas the 27th. At Key West in early May, she departed the 20th to join the force then building under Rear Admiral William T. Sampson to move against Santiago. Puritan linked up on the 22nd and Sampson moved his ships to Key Frances on the Nicholas Channel to execute his plan to contain the Spanish Fleet at Santiago. The success of Sampson’s squadron at Santiago 3 July resulted in almost complete destruction of the Spanish Fleet.

 

Following war-time service, Puritan served as a practice ship for the Naval Academy from 1899 to 1902. She decommissioned 16 April 1903 at Philadelphia but recommissioned 3 June to serve as a receiving ship at League Island. In 1904 she was loaned to the Naval Militia of Washington, D.C. and served with them until 14 September 1909. Puritan then moved to Norfolk where she decommissioned 23 April 1910. She was struck from the Navy List 27 February 1918 and sold, 26 January 1922, to J. G. Hetner and W. F. Cutler of Philadelphia.