Return to DANFS IndexImage of an anchorReturn to Naval Historical Center homepage
flag banner
Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships banner
DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY -- NAVAL HISTORICAL CENTER
805 KIDDER BREESE SE -- WASHINGTON NAVY YARD
WASHINGTON DC 20374-5060

Osceola

 

Osceola, the son of an Englishman and a Creek Mother was probably born in Georgia about 1800. A noted Seminole chief and leader during the second Seminole War, Osceola was seized when he appeared for a conference in October 1837 and died in prison at Fort Moultrie, S. C., 30 January 1838.

 

III

 

(YTB–129: dp. 890; l. 124’9”; b. 28’; dr. 14’)

 

The third Osceola, a harbor tug launched by the Navy Yard, Charleston, S. C. 3 March 1938; and commissioned 1 June 1938.

 

In 1928 the Navy Expansion Act authorized the construction of increased tonnage as defense of the Western Hemisphere became an essential element of the United States. Osceola was one of the smaller ships built at the time. Her name was assigned 17 September 1938, and she reported to the 14th Naval District, headquartered at Pearl Harbor.

 

Stationed at Pearl Harbor throughout her war-time Naval service, Osceola provided assistance in maneuvering larger ships, rendered towing service for naval vessels, and stood ready to aid in water-front fire protection. Her class was changed to YTB–129, 12 April 1944.

 

After the war, Osceola continued to provide her vital service to the Navy. Her classification changed to YTM–129 in early 1962, and she remains active with the U. S. Pacific fleet into 1970.