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McCall

 

Capt. Edward R. McCall, born in 1790 in South Carolina, was appointed midshipman 1 January 1808. Appointed acting lieutenant in brig Enterprise 16 October 1811, he took command of his ship during her action with HMS Boxer 5 September 1813, early in which Enterprise’s captain, Lt. William Burrows, was mortally wounded. In acknowledgment of his victory over Boxer, McCall received the thanks of Congress and a gold medal. Promoted to captain 3 March 1835, he died at his home in Bordentown, N.J., 1 August 1853.

 

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(DD‑28: dp. 742; l. 293'11"; b. 26'11"; dr. 8'4"; s. 29.5 k.; cpl. 89; a. 4 3", 4 18" tt.; cl. Roe)

 

McCall (DD‑28) was laid down 8 June 1909 by the New York Shipbuilding Co., Camden, N.J.; launched 4 June 1910; sponsored by Miss Jessie Willits; and commissioned 23 January 1911, Lt. Comdr. J. T. Tomkins in command.

 

Attached to the Torpedo Flotilla, Atlantic Fleet, McCall operated along the Atlantic coast, principally out of Newport, R.I., and in the Chesapeake Bay area. Each winter found her with the fleet in Cuban waters for maneuvers.

 

In 1916 McCall made neutrality patrols off New York and along the New England coast. On 14 June 1917, following overhaul at Philadelphia, she steamed to New York to escort a troop convoy to Europe. The torpedo boat destroyer continued to perform escort duties in the western Atlantic until January 1918 when she sailed for Queenstown, Ireland. Arriving there 22 February, she provided escort and rescue services until 16 December.

 

Upon return to the United States in January 1919 she resumed east coast operations until decommissioning at Philadelphia 12 December 1919. In reserve for the next 412 years, she was transferred to the U.S. Coast Guard 7 June 1924. She was returned to the Navy 18 October 1930 and was scrapped and sold 2 May 1934, in accordance with the terms of the London Treaty for Naval Disarmament.