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DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY -- NAVAL HISTORICAL CENTER
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Manville

 

A borough of north‑central New Jersey known for its manufactured goods, farm products and stone quarries.

 

(PC‑581: dp. 280; l. 173'8"; b. 23'; dr. 6'6"; s. 20.2 k. cpl. 59; a. 1 3", 1 40mm., 5 20mm.; cl. PC‑461)

 

Manville (PC‑581) was laid down as PC‑581 by Albina Engine & Machine Works, Inc., Portland, Oreg., 12 February 1942; launched 8 July 1942; sponsored by Mrs. P. L. Symons; and commissioned 9 October 1942, Lt. Comdr. Mark E. Dennett in command.

 

PC‑581 departed Portland 11 October for a shakedown cruise before arriving at the Naval Station, Treasure Island, San Francisco Bay, the 26th to perform escort and patrol duty. On 14 December the submarine chaser steamed for Humboldt Bay, Eureka, Calif., where, upon arrival the next day, she was assigned to a patrol‑escort unit of the 12th Naval District.

 

While on patrol off Humboldt Bay the night of 23 January, PC‑581 participated in the rescue operation for Army transport San Diego, wrecked and abandoned off St. George’s Reef. She took on 25 survivors.

 

On 3 February the ship returned to San Francisco Bay. From 17 June until 27 July PC‑581 served off Seattle, Wash. On 1 August she arrived at Dutch Harbor, Alaska, to operate in the Aleutians until 29 November.

 

PC 581 then departed for Pearl Harbor arriving 7 December to be assigned to the Hawaiian Sea frontier. On 15 April 1944 she reported to the 5th Amphibious Force to train for the invasion of Saipan, Marianas, 15 June. She got underway for the Marianas 25 May as part of a task group screen, arrived off Blue Beach, Saipan, 15 June and served as control vessel for landing craft through the 17th. For the next month the submarine chaser performed escort and patrol service.

 

PC‑581 took station as control vessel again during the invasion of Tinian 24 July. Shortly after Tinian was secured 2 August, she returned to Saipan for patrol‑escort operations. On the 14th the ship rescued two survivors of a B‑24 which crashed while returning from the Bonin Islands. Nine days later she captured two Japanese soldiers attempting to escape from Tinian in a cardboard carton on top of an automobile innertube. The ship underwent 18 enemy air raids during service in the Marianas before her departure 2 March 1945 for Pearl Harbor.

 

She returned to the Marianas after overhaul, arriving off Guam 1 June. The PC continued air‑sea rescue operations, saving some 20 U.S. airmen, until 22 June when she began the first of three round trips as escort between the Marianas and Iwo Jima. On 23 November PC‑581 departed Guam for the west coast, via Eniwetok and Pearl Harbor, reaching San Diego 14 December.

 

In early January 1946, PC‑581 got underway for New York via the Panama Canal and Miami, Fla., arriving the 23d. She stood out from New York 17 April for Norfolk, Va., and sailed 18 May for the Caribbean. Following a year of patrol‑escort duty between Trinidad and San Juan, P.R., she departed San Juan 1 April 1947, arriving Charleston, S.C., 29 May.

 

With Newport, R.I., as her homeport beginning 8 August PC‑581 spent the next 10 years operating off the east coast and in the Caribbean. On 15 February 1956 she was named Manville.

 

Arriving Green Cove Springs, Fla., 17 February 1959, Manville entered the Atlantic Reserve Fleet, and decommissioned 27 March 1959. Manville was struck from the Navy list 1 April 1960 following transfer 24 March 1960 under the Military Assistance Program to the Republic of Indonesia, whom she now serves as Torani (318).