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DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY -- NAVAL HISTORICAL CENTER
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Manchineel

 

A poisonous tropical American tree of the spurge family of shrubby plants having a blistering milky juice and apple‑shaped fruit; from diminutive of Spanish manzana meaning “apple.”

 

(AN‑54: dp. 1,460 (lim.); l. 194'6"; b. 37'6"; dr. 13'6" (lim.); s. 12.1 k.; cpl. 56; a. 13", 3 20mm.)

 

YN‑73, originally named Sumac, was renamed Manchineel 3 April 1943; laid down 8 June 1943 by Pollock-Stockton Shipbuilding Co., Stockton, Calif.; launched 1 January 1944; sponsored by Mrs. Warren Atherton; redesignated AN‑54 20 January 1944; and commissioned 26 April 1944, Lt. William B. Brown, USNR, in command.

 

Following shakedown off San Pedro, Calif., Manchineel departed 22 June for the South Pacific, arriving Pearl Harbor 1 July. She operated off Pearl Harbor until 5 September when she sailed for the Marshalls, arriving at Majuro Atoll the 15th. After removing the nets around the atoll, Manchineel continued on to Kwajalein 22 September, arriving 4 days later for net‑tending duties until 20 May 1945.

 

The net‑laying ship then steamed for the Gilbert Islands, arriving Tarawa 23 May to pick up six pontoon barges for tow to Majuro. The trip took 6 long days of retrieving and dragging the water‑filled pontoons. Manchineel returned to Kwajalein 2 June to resume net operations.

 

Except for a week at Eniwetok in July, Manchineel remained in the Kwajalein area through the announcement of Japan’s surrender 15 August. On 10 October the ship departed for the west coast via Pearl Harbor, arriving San Francisco 3 November for mooring duty.

 

Manchineel decommissioned 11 March 1946, was stripped at Mare Island Naval Shipyard, and was struck from the Navy list 12 April. On 18 June 1947 Manchineel was transferred to the Maritime Commission and delivered to Walter H. Wilms following sale 2 days earlier.