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DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY -- NAVAL HISTORICAL CENTER
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Mustang

 

The first Mustang retained her former name. The second Mustang isnamed for a small wild or semiwild horse of the southwestern plains of the United States.

 

I

 

(SP‑36: t. 37 (gr.); l. 65'; b. 12'6"; dr. 7'; s. 12 k.; cpl. 9; a. 1 1‑pdr.)

 

The first Mustang (SP‑36), a wooden‑hulled, gas‑powered yacht, was built by National Boat & Electric Co., St. Joseph, Mich., in 1911; purchased by the Navy from her owner, Henry S. Beardsley of New York City, 6 July 1917; and commissioned 2 October 1917, Chief Boatswain A. Daunt, USNRF, in command.

 

Assigned to the 3d Naval District, Mustang operated out of Section Base No. 7, Whitestone, Long Island, during World War I. She patrolled the western reaches of Long Island Sound and the approaches to the East River. Following the Armistice, she was sold to Allen N. Spooner & Son of New York City 23 July 1919.

 

II

 

(IX‑155: t. 566 (gr.);1. 170'4"; b. 37'6"; dph. 12'8"; a. none)

 

The second Mustang (IX‑155), a four‑master wooden schooner, was built as William H. Smith in 1899 by H. K. Hall, Port Blakely, Wash. During the next four decades she sailed the Pacific coast between San Francisco and Alaskan ports in the fishing trade. She was acquired by the Navy from Alaska Salmon Co. of San Francisco, 28 January 1944; converted for Navy use by Pacific Drydock & Repair Co., Oakland, Calif.; and renamed Mustang 6 February 1944.

 

Following completion of her conversion 17 April 1944, Mustang was assigned to the Amphibious Training Base at Coronado, Calif. During the remainder of World War II she provided training facilities at Coronado. She was declared surplus to Navy needs 16 May 1946, her name struck from the Navy list 5 June, and she was transferred to the Maritime Commission. Subsequently she was sold to Arthur Banks of Los Angeles.