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Morris

 

Robert Morris, born in Liverpool, England, 20 January 1734, emigrated to Maryland in 1747. The next year he moved to Philadelphia where, after brief schooling, he entered the service of the Willings, shipping merchants. Rising to partnership in 1754, Morris rapidly attained great power and influence in the commercial and political life of America. Appointed to the Pennsylvania Committee of Safety in June 1775, he was extremely active, arming both Pennsylvanian and Continental forces. Joining the Continental Congress in November 1776, he was a signer of the Declaration of Independence.

 

Morrisí key role in the financial affairs of the new nation led to his appointment as Superintendent of Finance in May 1781 and Agent of Marine that September. His extraordinary skill in both offices greatly contributed to American success in the Revolution. A delegate to the Constitutional Convention, Morris served in the U.S. Senate 1789‑1795, but declined to stand for reelection. He continued his leadership in business and banking until impoverished when values of his extensive land holdings collapsed. Morris died in Philadelphia 8 May 1806.

 

V

 

(TB‑14: dp. 105 (normal); l. 139'6"; b. 15'6"; dr. 4'1" (mean); s. 23 k.; cpl. 26; a. 3 1‑pdr., 3 18" tt.; cl. Morris)

 

The fifth Morris (TB‑14) was laid down by Herreshoff Manufacturing Co., Bristol, R.I., 19 November 1897; launched 13 April 1898; and commissioned 11 May 1898, Lt. C. E. Fox in command.

 

After east coast shakedown, Morris arrived Newport, R.I., for range tender and training services until World War I, when patrol duties were assigned. From 19 April 1918 through early March 1919 she patrolled the West Indies, until the Armistice investigating suspected enemy sabotage. Now known as Coast Torpedo Boat No. 6, she returned to Newport and decommissioned 24 March 1919, but served as torpedo range tender there for 5 years. Last of the old torpedo boats, she was struck from the Naval Register 24 January 1924, and sold af public auction 10 October 1924 to Frank B. Jones of Wilmington, Del.