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DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY -- NAVAL HISTORICAL CENTER
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Modoc

 

A small tribe of Lutuanian Indians from northeastern California, who, following a long series of wars with the whites, was placed part upon the Klamath Reservation, Oreg., and part upon the Quapaw in Oklahoma.

 

(Mon.: dp. 1,175; l. 225'; b. 45'; dph. 71; a. 2 guns)

 

Modoc, a single turret, light‑draft monitor was built under contract by J. S. Underhill, New York, N.Y., and completed in June 1865. She saw no service in the Navy. Her name was changed to Achilles 15 June 1869 and then back to Modoc 10 August. The ship was sold to John Roach and broken up at New York in August 1875.

 

I

 

(YT‑16: dp. 240; l. 96'9"; b. 20'8"; dr. 9'3"; a. 10 k.; cpl. 7)

 

The first Modoc, a non‑seagoing, iron yard tug was built as Enterprise by J. H. Dialogue & Sons, Camden, N.J., in 1890 and acquired by the Navy from the American Towing Co. during the Spanish‑American War 29 April 1898.

 

Assigned to the Philadelphia Navy Yard, Modoc operated at that installation for the next 48 years. From 1899 to 1905, the tug made frequent voyages to New York, Boston, and Annapolis, towing cargo and then was assigned to the 4th Naval District before the United States entered World War I. Modoc continued her service to the fleet through the end of World War II. Designated YT‑16 in 1920, her name was canceled 5 October 1942. She was redesignated YTL‑16 in 1944 and continued on in service as a light yard tug in Philadelphia until turned over to the Maritime Commission for disposal 30 January 1947.