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Lynde McCormick

 

Lynde Dupuy McCormick was born in Annapolis, Md., 12 August 1895, son of Rear Adm. A. M. Depuy McCormick. After attending St. Johnís Preparatory School and College, he graduated from the Naval Academy with distinction 4 June 1915. He served in Wyoming with the British Grand Fleet during World War I, then in South Carolina and Buchanan. His commands at sea included Kennedy and submarines R‑10 and V‑2. An expert in logistics, he won the Legion of Merit and two gold stars in lieu of additional awards of the same decoration for service as war plans officer for the Pacific Fleet; as assistant chief of Naval Operations for Logistic Plans and chief adviser on logistics to the Joint Chiefs of Staff; ‑and as commander, Battleship Division 3 in action against Okinawa. As vice admiral he was deputy commander in chief, Pacific Fleet, then vice chief of Naval Operations. Upon the death of Adm. Forrest Sherman he became acting chief of Naval Operations, then served as commander in chief, Atlantic Fleet and Supreme Allied Commander Atlantic under NATO. His final service was as president of the Naval War College. He died 16 August 1956 at Newport.

 

(DDG‑8: dp. 3,190; l. 432'; b. 47'; dr. 21': s. 30 k.; cpl. 354; a' 2 5", Tar. mis., ASROC, 2 tt.: cl. Charles F. Adams)

 

Lynde McCormick (DDG‑8) was laid down 4 April 1958 by Defoe Shipbuilding Co., Bay City, Mich.; launched 28 July 1959; sponsored by Mrs. Lillian McCormick, wife of Admiral McCormick; and commissioned at Boston 3 June 1961, Cmdr. Ernest S. Cornwall, Jr., in command.

 

Lynde McCormick departed Boston 23 August 1961 for her home port, San Diego, arriving 16 September. Early in 1962 she tested her missiles and antisubmarine weaponry in the Pacific missile range. Exercises and experiments continued in preparation for deployment to the western Pacific, for which she sailed 19 November 1962.

 

She arrived Yokosuka 6 December and within a week was on station with a 7th Fleet task group, taking up her part in the schedule of readiness training and exercises which have made the 7th Fleet a potent force working for peace in the Far East. Returning San Diego 15 June 1963, she proceeded to Sacramento to help initiate its new deep water, port. All‑encompassing refresher training followed overhaul and modification at Hunterís Point early in 1964, increasing her antiair warfare capabilities. A high state of readiness had been achieved when the Tonkin Bay incidents of 2 and 4 August escalated the conflict in Vietnam.

 

In company with CruDesFlot 11, Lynde McCormick departed 5 August for a 6‑month deployment along the Vietnamese coast, primarily in the screen for Bon Homme Richard and other carriers. She returned to San Diego 6 February 1965. Lynde McCormick spent the remainder of the year conducting coastal exercises, a successful competitive firing of her, missiles, and a summer cruise to Hawaii training midshipmen.

 

After antisubmarine exercises with the Canadian Navy in January 1966, Lynde McCormick prepared for a third tour of duty in WestPac. She left San Diego 1 March and 1 month later was shelling Vietcong bunkers and gun emplacements in the Mekong Delta. In May she sailed up the eastern coast to support Yankee Station carrier operations against North Vietnam until August, when she sailed for her home port, arriving San Diego the 26th. On 27 October she entered drydock at Long Beach for a thorough overhaul. This was completed 23 March 1967.

 

Refresher training began on 15 May, and was interrupted on the 27th when she rushed to the aid of a stricken crewmember of 88 Pacific Comet. DDG‑8 continued operating out of San Diego until 17 August, at which time she departed for another WestPac deployment.

 

Lynde McCormick saw extensive action on the gunline and in patrolling the Vietnam coastline. Many rounds of 5‑inch ammunition were expended at enemy emplacements and supply lines, in aid of United States and other Allied troops ashore. The ship returned to the west coast 6 April 1968 and operated in the eastern Pacific for the remainder of the year, into 1969.