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Huron

 

Center lake in the Great Lakes and a city in east central South Dakota. Huron IV and V were named after the city.

 

III

 

(Str: t. 10,170; l. 523'; b. 60'; dr. 34'; s. 15 k.; cpl. 446)

 

The third Huron was built as Friedrich Der Grosse in 1896 by Vulcan Shipbuilding Corp. Stettin, Germany, and sailed the Atlantic for North German Lloyd Lines until being interned in New York Harbor in 1914. She was seized as a prize of war 6 April 1917. Her crew had sabotaged her boilers so the ship was taken to Robbins Dry-dock Co., Brooklyn for repairs. The USSB then turned the ship over to the Navy, and she commissioned at New York Navy Yard 25 July 1917 as Fredrick Der Grosse. The ship, Comdr. S. H. R. Doyle in command, was renamed Huron 1 September 1917.

 

Huron acted as a troop transport during the remaining years of the war. She made eight round trips to France before the Armistice, and then seven more, bringing American soldiers back from Europe.

 

She arrived New York after her last voyage 23 August 1919 and decommissioned 2 September for return to the USSB.

 

Huron operated in the Atlantic for the U.S. Mail Lines (later U.S. Lines) from 1920 to 1922. Renamed City of Honolulu in May 1922, she was turned over to the Los Angeles Steamship Co.; and on her maiden voyage caught fire 12 October and sank with no loss of passengers or crew.

 

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Ocean tug Allegheny (q.v.) was originally named Huron, but renamed before launching.