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DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY -- NAVAL HISTORICAL CENTER
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Hartley

 

The first Hartley retained her former name; the second was named for Admiral Henry Hartley.

 

Henry Hartley was born in Bladensburg, Md., 8 May 1884. Enlisting in the Navy 1 February 1901, he came up through the ranks and was commissioned lieutenant 3 August 1920. A specialist in salvage work, Hartley was instrumental in salvaging the sunken submarines 8-51 and 8-4, for which he received the Navy Cross and the Distinguished Service Medal. After establishing the Deep Sea Diving School at Washington, D.C., in 1928 and serving as its commander, Hartley continued his pioneer research in techniques of salvage work. As technical aid to Rear Admiral Cyrus Cole, he helped supervise the dramatic rescue and salvage work on the sunken submarine Squalus in 1939. During World War II, Hartley served first in the Mediterranean, where his transport Susan B. Anthony participated in the invasion of Sicily, and then shifted to the Pacific. As commander of Chester, flagship of Service Squadron 10, Hartley participated in the Battle of Leyte Gulf, a major turning point of the war, and then engaged in bombardment and salvage work at Wake Island, Marcus Island, Iwo Jima, Haha Jima, and Okinawa. After commanding SerRon 10 for a year with the rank of Commodore, Hartley returned to Washington in March 1946 for special duty. After 46 years of service to his country, he retired with the rank of Rear Admiral 1 May 1947. Admiral Hartley died at Bethesda, Md., 6 March 1953.

 

I

 

(dp. 64; l. 64'6" ; b. 11; dr. 6'6" ; s. 7 k.; cpl. 5)

 

Hartley was built at San Francisco in 1875. Acquired from the Coast Guard for use in World War I, she served as a harbor patrol ship out of San Francisco. Hartley was returned to the Coast Guard 15 February 1919.