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DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY -- NAVAL HISTORICAL CENTER
805 KIDDER BREESE SE -- WASHINGTON NAVY YARD
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H-3

 

(SS-30: dp. 358 (n.) ; l. 150'4" ; b. 15'10" ; dr. 12'5" ; s. 14 k.; cpl. 25; a. 418" tt.; cl. H-l)

 

H-3 (SS-30) originally Garfish and renamed 17 November 1911, was built by the Moran Co. of Seattle; launched 3 July 1913; sponsored by Miss Helen MacEwan ; and commissioned at Puget Sound on 16 January 1914, Lt. (j.g.) William R. Munroe in command.

 

After shakedown, H-3 was attached to the Pacific Fleet and began operations along the coast from lower California to Washington, exercising frequently with H-l and H-2. While engaged in operations off the northern California coast near Eureka with Milwaukee and Cheyenne, H-3 ran aground in heavy fog on the morning of 16 December 1916. The crew were rescued by Coast Guard breeches buoy, but after Milwaukee was also stranded trying to pull the sub off the beach, the Navy called in a commercial salvage firm. Their job was especially complicated because H-3 lay high up on a sandy beach, surrounded by quicksand; at low tide she was 75 feet from the water, but at high tide the ocean reached almost 250 beyond her. After a month of hard work, H-3 was finally salvaged by being placed on giant log rollers and taken overland to the sea.

 

Having decommissioned 4 February 1917 while salvage work was still going on, she was relaunched 20 April 1917 at Humboldt Bay. She then returned to San Pedro, where she served as flagship of SubDiv 7, participating in exercises and operations along the coast until 1922. H-3, with the entire division, sailed from San Pedro on 25 July 1922 and reached Hampton Roads 14 September.

 

H-3 decommissioned at Hampton Roads on 23 October 1922. She was struck from the Navy List 18 December 1930 and scrapped on 14 September 1931.

 

 

USS H-3 (SS-30), previously USS Garfish, built at Seattle 1911 through 1914