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Governor Tompkins

 

Daniel D. Tompkins, born 21 June 1774 in Scarsdale, N.Y., graduated from Columbia College in 1795 and took up the practice of law in New York City. He later entered politics as a Republican. He was a member of the state constitutional convention in 1801 and of the Assembly in 1803; was elected to Congress in 1804, but resigned to accept appointment as an associate justice of the New York Supreme Court. Daniel Tompkins was elected to New York governorship in 1807, 1810, 1813, and 1816. He served as Vice President of the United States from 1817 to 1825, presiding over the state constitutional convention in 1821. He died at his home on Staten Island 11 June 1825.

 

(Sch: t. 96; cpl. 40; a. 6 g.)

 

Governor Tompkins was purchased in October 1812 at Oswego, N.Y., as the merchant ship Charles & Ann.

 

Governor Tompkins appeared on Lake Ontario 8 November 1812 as a unit of Commodore Isaac Chauncey's squadron which transported and lent fire support to the Army landings for the raid on Kingston 9 December 1812, the capture of York 27 April 1813, and the capture of Fort George, 27 May 1813. The effect of the latter victory caused the British to evacuate the whole Niagara river frontier. This allowed Captain Oliver Hazard Perry, up above Niagara Falls, to get brig Caledonia and four schooners past the British batteries and into Lake Erie, a most important addition to Perry's fleet.

 

Governor Tompkins joined Chauncey's squadron in running engagements with the British squadron 7 and 11 August 1813; and, in a long-range engagement 11 September. The two squadrons again joined battle in York Bay 28 September 1813 and the British squadron was forced to flee. The victory established Chauncey's supremacy in control over the lakes. He continued to blockade the British squadron at Kingston while dispatching Lt. Jesse D. Elliott to Lake Erie to establish a naval base there. Elliott's hard work until winter closed the Lakes to navigation, laid the groundwork for Commodore Perry's great victory in the Battle of Lake Erie the following year.

 

Governor Tompkins was laid up at Sacket's Harbor on close of the War of 1812. She was sold 15 May 1815.