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Emery

 

Jack Mandeville Emery, born 9 October 1916 in Los Angeles, Calif., was appointed ensign in the U.S. Naval Reserve 20 May 1939, and reported for active duty in Arizona (BB-39) 13 November 1939. He was killed in action when Arizona was lost in the attack on Pearl Harbor 7 December 1941.

 

(DE-28: dp. 1,140; l. 289'5"; b. 35'1"; dr. 8'3"; s. 21 k.; cpl. 156; a. 3 3", 8 dcp., 1 dcp.(hh.), 2 dct.; cl. Evarts)

 

Emery (DE-28) was launched 17 April 1943 by Mare Island Navy Yard without a name, as BDE-28; reallocated to the United States; assigned the name Eisner 14 June 1943; renamed Emery 14 July 1943; and commissioned 14 August 1943, Lieutenant Commander R. G. Coburn, USNR, in command.

 

Emery cleared Pearl Harbor 1 November 1943 for Funafuti and a month of local escort duty in preparation for the invasion of the Gilbert Islands, during which she screened vulnerable tankers fueling assault ships and their covering force of major combatants. She returned to Pearl Harbor 16 December for training, and on 16 January 1944 put to sea to protect tankers again during the assault on the Marshalls, after which she escorted convoys between Majuro and Funafuti until 9 March.

 

Between March 1944 and September, Emery sailed out of Port Purvis escorting combatants, auxiliaries, and merchantmen to Emirau, Green Island, Bougainville, and other southwest Pacific ports. She arrived at Manus 27 September, and after screening a small convoy to the Russell Islands, proceeded to Peleliu for antisubmarine patrol and an escort voyage to Ulithi. She returned to Ulithi for brief overhaul in November, then swung back through the Marianas and Marshalls on convoy duty, arriving at Eniwetok 4 March. This was her base through July 1945, as she carried out escort missions to Guam, Saipan, Ulithi, Iwo Jima, and Kwajalein. Thus she guarded the movement of men and supplies essential to the seaborne advance on Japan. On 5 July she sailed for San Francisco, where she was decommissioned 15 November 1945, and sold 21 July 1947.

 

Emery received four battle stars for World War II service.