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Doyen

 

Charles A. Doyen, born in New Hampshire 3 September 1859, was a member of the Naval Academy class of 1881, later commissioned second lieutenant in the Marine Corps. He organized and commanded the 5th Regiment in World War I, and in France took command of the 4th Brigade, composed of the 5th and 6th Regiments and the 6th Gun Battalion. His devoted service training this brigade broke his health, and he was forced to return to the United States, where he died 6 October 1918. But his brigade went on to win historic victories at Chateau Thierry and in Belleau Wood. Doyen's contribution to these victories was recognized by the posthumous award of the Distinguished Service Medal.

 

I

 

(DD-280: dp. 1,190; l. 314'5"; b. 31'8"; dr. 9'3"; s. 35 k.; cpl. 120; a. 4 4", 2 3", 4 21" tt; cl. Clemson)

 

Doyen (DD-280) was launched 26 July 1919 by Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corp., Squantum, Mass.; sponsored by Miss F. E. Doyen, daughter of Brigadier General Doyen; and commissioned 17 December 1919, Commander J. H. Klein, Jr., in command.

 

Doyen arrived at San Diego 15 March 1920 to join the Pacific Fleet in local operations. Placed in active reserve status 17 August, she participated in local exercises and reserve training until placed out of commission 8 June 1922.

 

Doyen was recommissioned 26 September 1923 and resumed a schedule of training and tactical exercises along the west coast, in the Canal Zone, and the Hawaiian Islands. She sailed from San Diego 20 August to escort HIJMS Tama and to provide radio compass and communication for a nonstop west coast-to-Hawaii flight. Exercises were again conducted in the Canal Zone and the Caribbean in 1926, and later that year Doyen cruised to Bremerton for overhaul and to Ketchikan, Alaska, and Duncan Bay, British Columbia, for visits.

 

Doyen sailed 26 April 1927 for the east coast to participate in joint Army-Navy maneuvers at Newport. She returned to the west coast 25 June and resumed training operations and tactical exercises with the Battle Fleet on the west coast, out of Pearl Harbor and in the Canal Zone. Doyen was decommissioned 25 February 1930 and scrapped 20 December 1930 in accordance with the London Treaty for the limitation of naval armaments.