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Davison

 

Gregory Caldwell Davison, born 12 August 1871 in Jefferson City, Mo., graduated from the Naval Academy 27 May 1892. He served in many ships, specializing in torpedo boat operations. An excellent scientist as well as an efficient naval officer, Lieutenant Commander Davison was responsible for many inventions in ordnance and general naval science. Retiring 31 December 1907 he became Vice President of the Electric Boat Company, Groton, Conn., continuing his interest in and support of the Navy until his death 7 May 1935.

 

(DD-618: dp. 1,630; l. 348'4"; b. 36'1"; dr. 17'5"; s. 35 k.; cpl. 270; a. 4 5", 1 21" tt; cl. Benson)

 

Davison (DD-618) was launched 19 July 1942 by Federal Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., Kearny, N.J.; sponsored by Mrs. G. C. Davison; and commissioned 11 September 1942, Lieutenant Commander W. C. Winn in command.

 

Davison cleared New York 13 November 1942, screening transports carrying reinforcement troops and supplies to Safi, French Morocco between 8 and 18 December. She returned to New York 10 January 1943. After two more voyages to North Africa as convoy escort between 8 February and 28 April, she sailed from Norfolk 6 June for Oran, arriving 22 June. On the 4th of July she sortied with TF 85 for the invasion of Sicily on 10 July, acting as convoy escort and patrol vessel off the transport area until returning to Oran 22 July. Six days later she was en route to New York, arriving 8 August, and sailing 21 August for another convoy voyage to Bizerte, then sailed again on 7 October to screen a convoy by way of Belfast, Northern Ireland, to Palermo, Sicily. Like so many other Mediterranean convoys at this time, Davison's group came under heavy air attack from German planes based in South ern France, on 6 November while off Algiers. Firing to protect her charges, she splashed at least one enemy plane, and aided survivors of torpedoed Beatty (DD-640), and two merchantmen. She returned by way of Belfast to New York 24 January 1944, making two escort voyages to Northern Ireland and Scotland between 11 February and 21 April escorting convoys from Norfolk and New York to Naples, Marseilles, and Oran until 7 June 1945.

 

On 8 June 1945 Davison reported to Charleston, S.C., for conversion to a high-speed minesweeper. She was reclassified DMS-37, 23 June, and trained in mine-sweeping exercises in Chesapeake Bay until 27 August when she sailed from Norfolk for the western Pacific, arriving at Okinawa 15 October. She swept mines in the Yellow Sea, remaining in the Far East on occupation duty until 11 March 1946 when she cleared Yokosuka for San Francisco, arriving the last day of the month.

 

Davison served in the western Pacific again from 12 September 1946 to 29 March 1947, calling at Pearl Harbor, Eniwetok, Guam, Chinese and Korean ports, and Kwajalein. On 10 March 1948 she sailed west again with a team from the Naval Research Laboratory embarked for balloon tests in the Marshall Islands until returning to San Diego 4 June. Davison was placed out of commission in reserve at San Diego 24 June 1949. On 15 July 1955 she was reclassified DD-618.

 

Davison received three battle stars for World War II service.