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DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY -- NAVAL HISTORY AND HERITAGE COMMAND
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Louisville

 

(SwStr: t. 743; l. 231.5'; b. 38.6'; dph. 7.5')

 

Louisville, later known as Ouachita and Vicksburg, was built at New Albany, Ind., in 1861 and served privately in the Mississippi River area. Adm. D. D. Porter, USN, described her as "one of the largest and best steamers in western waters," and "the pride of the Mississippi." The Confederate army fitted her out at Port Hudson, La., in February 1863, and used her in the Mississippi River area as a cargo ship.

 

Louisville was captured on 13 July 1863 on the Little River, La., by Manitou and Rattler. These had sailed from the juncture of the Black, Ouachita and Tensas Rivers, and were part of a gunboat force under Lt. Comdr. T. Selfridge, USN, sent by Acting Rear Admiral Porter, USN.

 

Louisville was renamed Ouachita, on 29 September 1863 at Admiral Porter's request, and was commissioned in the U.S. Navy on 18 January 1864. She was operated privately after the war as Vicksburg, and sold abroad in 1869.