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Colonel Lamb

 

Col. William Lamb, CSA, commanding Fort Fisher, N.C., was the blockade runner's best friend: he saved many such daring ships not only by the guns of the fort but by a mobile battery of Whitworth rifles with which he often drove off Federal blockade ships attempting to capture a stranded runner within view of safety in the haven.

 

(SwStr: t. 1,788; l. 281'; b. 36'; dph. 15'6")

 

Colonel Lamb, one of the most famous and successful of the Confederate Navy's own blockade runners—a fine model of which can be seen in the Science Museum at Liverpool—was built in 1864 at that city as Jones, Quiggin & Company's Hull No. 165—a near sister to Hope which preceded her that year, but with muchlonger deckhouse and lacking the customary turtleback foredeck which Hope had.

 

She is identified with the dashing Captain Tom Lock-wood and was christened by his wife. The shipbuilder, William Quiggin, registered Colonel Lamb in his name, then quietly transferred her to Confederate agent J. B. Lafitte in Nassau, where she fitted out. She survived the war intact and was sold through Fraser, Trenholm & Co. to the Greek Government; as Bovhouling after loading at Liverpool a cargo of explosives for Brazil, she blew up at anchor in the Mersey the night before sailing.