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Carroll

 

Born in Baltimore, Md., 16 September 1911, Herbert Fuller Carroll, Jr., graduated from the Naval Academy 1 June 1934 with the rank of ensign. After almost continuous sea service, he reported to Astoria (CA-34). Lieutenant Carroll died in action 9 August 1942 during the Battle of Savo Island, in which Astoria was lost.

 

(DE-171: dp. 1,240; l. 306'; b. 36'8"; dr. 11'8"; s. 21 k.; cpl. 186; a. 3 3", 3 21" tt., 8 dcp., 1 dcp. (hh.), 2 dct.; cl. Cannon)

 

Carroll (DE-171) was launched 21 June 1943 by Norfolk Navy Yard; sponsored by Mrs. H. F. Carroll, Sr.; commissioned 24 October 1943, Lieutenant Commander F. W. Kuhn in command; and reported to the Atlantic Fleet.

 

Carroll was assigned to convoy escort duty, with its heavy demands for vigilance, ability to steam in all weather, and optimum readiness for duty at all times. Between 1 January 1944 and 9 May 1945, she made eight voyages between Norfolk and Gibraltar, Casablanca, Bizerte, and Algeria, guarding the men and supplies destined to carry the war through southern Europe. Between convovs, Carroll received necessary attention at east coast shipyards, and sharpened her training with exercises in Casco Bay.

 

With the coming to the European theater of the victory in which she had played a significant part, Carroll was reassigned to the Pacific Fleet, to which she reported at Cristobal, C.Z., 9 June 1945. She sailed to San Diego and Pearl Harbor for exercises through 15 July, when she sailed for Eniwetok, Saipan, and Ulithi, arriving 17 August.

 

Until 3 November 1945, Carroll patrolled the smaller islands of the Palau group searching for by-passed Japanese garrisons and prisoners of war. On 6 October, the surrender of Sonsorol, Fanna, Merir, and Tobi Islands was signed on her decks. She then furnished supplies, and supervised the evacuation of the islands by the Japanese. She was homeward bound on 3 November, and arrived at Jacksonville, Fla., 14 December. Here she was decommissioned and placed in reserve 19 June 1946.