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Baron

Lieutenant Commander Richard S. Baron was killed 15 March 1942 during the bombing of Cebu City, Philippine Islands. Prior to his death, he had received the Navy Cross for risking his life to recover classified documents during the bombardment of Cavite, Philippines.


(DE-166: dp. 1240; l. 306'; b. 36'8"; dr. 11'8:; s. 21 k.; cpl. 186; a. 3 3", 3 21" TT.; cl. Cannon)


Baron (DE-166) was launched 9 May 1943 by Federal Shipbuilding and Dry dock Co., Newark, N.J.; sponsored by Mrs. Anne Pl. Baron, widow of Lieutenant Commander Baron; and commissioned 5 July 1943, Lieutenant Commander D. McVicker, USNR, in command.


Baron departed New York 8 September 1943 for the Pacific. Between October 1943 and August 1944 she escorted convoys among the island groups of the South Central Pacific. She also acted as a screen and fire-support ship during the following operations: Hollandia landings (21-24 April 1944); Truk-Satawan-Ponape raid (29 April-1 May); Saipan invasion (20 June-11 July); and capture of Guam (22-29 July). On 7 September 1944 she arrived at Mare Island Navy Yard for an overhaul.


Returning to the Pacific early in November 1944, Baron reported to Commander, Submarine Training, Pacific. Until the end of May 1945 she conducted training exercises with friendly submarines off Pearl Harbor and Guam. For the remainder of the war she operated in the vicinity of the Marshall Islands engaged in hunter-killer, air-sea rescue, patrol, and escort duties.


On 27 August 1945 Baron was ordered to Maloelap, Wotje, and Jaluit Atolls for the surrender of their Japanese garrisons. The surrender was completed by 6 September and Baron remained at Wotje Atoll until 18 September supervising the disarmament of the Japanese fortifications. She then steamed to San Diego, arriving 29 September. Departing the next day, she proceeded to New York, where she arrived 14 October.


Baron went out of commission in reserve 26 April 1946 at Green Cove Springs, Fla., and was transferred to Uruguay under the Mutual Defense Assistance Program 3 May 1952.


Baron received three battle stars for her World War II service in the Pacific.



7 March 2006