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Alloway

 

A Delaware Indian chief who lived around the year 1675 in territory which now constitutes Salem County, N.J. The word Alloway is a Delaware term meaning "beautiful tail" and refers to the black fox. A creek in New Jersey and villages in Salem County, N.J., and Wayne County, N.J., bear the name Alloway. The World War I NOTS cargo ships was probably named for one or both of the villages; the World War II tug honors the chief.

 

II

 

(YT-170: dp. 95; 1. 71'; b. 19'; dr. 10'6")

 

The second Alloway (YT-170)—a diesel-powered tug built in 1935 as Russell No. 12—was acquired by the Navy on 28 October 1940 at New York from the Newton Creek Towing Co.; renamed Alloway the following day and simultaneously designated YT-170; converted to naval service by the New York Navy Yard; and placed in service at New York on 7 November 1940.

 

Alloway was initially ordered to the 5th Naval District and stationed at the Naval Proving Grounds at Dahlgren, Va., where she served through the end of World War II. During her tour of duty, Alloway was reclassified a medium harbor tug and redesignated YTM-170 on 15 May 1944. On 21 March 1946, she was assigned to temporary duty with the 5th Naval District at Norfolk preparatory to her inactivation. Alloway was placed out of service at Little Creek, Va., on 19 August 1946. Her name was struck from the Navy list on 10 June 1947, and she was turned over to the Maritime Commission's War Shipping Administration for disposal.