Navy Medical Art of the Abbott Collection

 

 

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Even the Enemy Gets Medical Attention
Joseph Hirsch #19
Oil on canvas, circa 1943
Gift of Abbott Laboratories
88-159-FS


Although a Marine guard is stationed at the door, this Japanese prisoner with malaria is accorded the same civil, careful treatment given our own sick men. Aiea Naval Hospital, Pearl Harbor.


Navy Doctor
Joseph Hirsch #20
Charcoal, circa 1943
Gift of Abbott Laboratories
88-159-FT

In the combat zones his work is without end. This one serves with the Marines, since all of the medical personnel of the Marine Corps is supplied by the Navy.


Spinal Anesthesia
Joseph Hirsch #10
Charcoal, circa 1943
Gift of Abbott Laboratories
88-159-FJ


The operating room of a large Navy ship is little different than those in our most modern hospitals. This man is being anesthetized spinally before the setting of a compound fracture suffered when he fell forty feet down a hatch.


On the Double
Joseph Hirsch #14
Watercolor, circa 1943
Gift of Abbott Laboratories
88-159-FN


Seldom waiting for the cry of "Medic!", the Navy's litter bearers attached to battalion aid stations serving the Marine Corps are to be found in the thick of every shore engagement in which the latter fights. Thanks in part to such men as those pictured her, 97 out of every 100 Americans wounded in the present conflict are saved from death. These corpsmen carry morphine, plasma and sulfa drugs as a part of their regular equipment.


Navy Nurse
Joseph Hirsch #23
Oil on canvas, circa 1943
Gift of Abbott Laboratories
88-159-EQ


An important function of the Navy nurse is to instruct hospital corpsmen. Here one nurse supervises the administration of an anesthetic, Pentothal Sodium, which is being given intravenously preparatory to resetting a patient's leg. On the man's thigh is a Roger Anderson fracture device, having pins to hold the bone in place. This patient, a Marine raider under treatment in a Navy mobile hospital unit in New Caledonia, was hit by a Japanese bullet that pierced both legs, fracturing the left thigh, and severing a nerve in his right leg.


Chart Accompanies the Patient
Joseph Hirsch #24
Watercolor, circa 1943
Gift of Abbott Laboratories
88-159-ER


Case histories of battle casualties are attached to the patient's stretchers for convenience. This Navy medical officer checks over a wounded Marine's record as he is borne off ship.


Everything Must Be Spotless
Joseph Hirsch #5
Charcoal, circa 1943
Gift of Abbott Laboratories
88-159-FE


The medical officer on a Navy ship does much more then treat sick and wounded men. Part of his job is to inspect the kitchens, toilets, and living quarters of all personnel aboard. If similar preventive measures could be instituted generally in civilian life, the incidence of many diseases might be drastically cut.


Medical Magic
Irwin Hoffman #3
Pastel, circa 1943
Gift of Abbott Laboratories
88-159-FY


Another forward step in medical invention, a spray gun is used to apply a new healing wax solution to the flame-scarred skin of a seaman in a Navy base hospital. A corpsman applies the preparation under the supervision of the head of the hospital surgical department.



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