Return to Naval Historical Center home page. Return to Art Collection Page
DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY -- NAVAL HISTORICAL CENTER
805 KIDDER BREESE SE -- WASHINGTON NAVY YARD
WASHINGTON DC 20374-5060

Lawrence Beall-Smith (1909-1989)

 

Language All Their Own
Lawrence Beall-Smith #1
Oil, 1943
Gift of Abbott Laboratories
88-159-JO

Hand signals are the language of the flight deck aboard an aircraft carrier. Little else would be distinguishable above the roar of engines and the rush of wind. Here taxi signalmen impart their terse messages to pilots and chockmen as they spot landed planes at appointed parking places. The signalmen in the foreground signifies by clenched fist that he wishes the pilot to lock his brakes, while with his right hand he tells the chockmen to pull clear the wheel chocks. Planes aboard a carrier are always chocked against the wind and roll of the deck except when taxiing or when being moved by a handling crew. In the background, an Avenger torpedo bomber already has folded its wings to conserve deck space.

 

Serviced and Ready
Lawrence Beall-Smith #2
Oil, 1943
Gift of Abbott Laboratories
88-159-JP

The aircraft carrier, as well as being a mobile airfield, is a service station deluxe. Once aboard and spotted by the Flight Deck Officer at its appointed parking place, the plane is taken in hand immediately by a servicing crew. It is refueled, cleaned, checked and inspected for instant use. At the same time, a crewman lashes down wings with running lines attached to deck fittings. Wing lashings are necessary on the exposed flight deck, where heavy winds and even seas sweep its broad expanse.

 

Securing Fuel Hoses
Lawrence Beall-Smith #6
Charcoal, 1943
Gift of Abbott Laboratories
88-159-JT

When all incoming planes have been parked or taken below, and servicing completed, plane handling crews secure the fuel lines. A detail is pictured here stowing a gasoline hose at the edge of the flight deck--a job requiring care and experience, since improperly secured fuel stowage aboard a carrier constitutes a deadly hazard.

 

Swab Down
Lawrence Beall-Smith #3
Oil, 1943
Gift of Abbott Laboratories
88-159-JQ

 

A crewman rubs down finishing touches to the white-starred insignia of a fighting plane parked on the deck of an aircraft carrier. Plane surfaces are carefully swabbed down to remove any accumulations of dirt, oil and salt.

Online Exhibtis that feature Lawrence Beall-Smith's work

The Battle of Midway

Naval Aviation of WWII From the Abbott Laboratories Collection

Page 2 of 2

Back to previous page

Search the NHC site. Back to exhibit listing

Return to Naval Historical Center home page. Return to Art Collection Page
21 April 2006